Book haul - March 30, 2018

 Why are there no versions of  Deepsix  with this design? To wound me?

Why are there no versions of Deepsix with this design? To wound me?

  1. Deepsix by Jack McDevitt - The second in the Prsiscilla Hutchins series of novels. I'm not done with the first yet - The Engines of God - but I adore it. It's the second sci-fi book I've connected with immediately and deeply in the last five years, the first being the Long Earth series by Terry Pratchett and Stephen Baxter. I have yet to see a single copy of Deepsix, anywhere (yep, even online) that matches the design of my copy of The Engines of God. The copy of Chindi I sold had that same design. Yeah, I bought it without knowing it was the third in the series, didn't read it for about seven (?!) years, sold it because I figured I'd not be getting back to it--then thought of it one day, and whether I'd fucked up and bought a book from the middle of a series again (like I did with Matter by Iain M. Banks). No idea what made me think all of that. Glad it happened though.

  2. The Drive In by Joe R. Lansdale - Another long journey to end up with this book. There was a comic adaptation published by Avatar around 10 years ago maybe. It had memorable art, and was totally fucking bonkers sci-fi/horror. I remember not really liking it, but I also know it stuck with me. My tastes in genre have morphed over the years, and I've liked Lansdale since I encountered his stuff (I think through his website, specifically a story he wrote that's maybe called Billie Sue). When I read Paperbacks From Hell by Grady Hendrix and Will Errickson, this book popped onto my radar. I'm fairly sure I never knew it was a short story first.

  3. The Man Who Fell To Earth by Walter Tevis - I've never seen the movie, but I plan on it soon. I have another Walter Tevis novel somewhere on the shelves, but I haven't cataloged it yet so I don't know what/where it is at the moment. Move tie-in covers are horrendous, forever and always, but there's always one or two which show up to break the rule. I have the movie tie-in cover of Alan Turing: An Enigma by Andrew Hodgesthe version where Benedict Cumberbatch is actually not showing off his cheeks, chin, and lips (a rarity for any tie-in cover, whether the actors have his bone structure or not). I think they actually did good with font choice, the color of the title, and showing off the Turing Machine. This copy of Tevis's novel transcends the rule of all tie-in covers sucking because of similar reasons: 1: Font and design choices, and 2: David Bowie. He's one of my universal, will-always-look-at-his-face, faces.

 The comic adaptation was four issues, black and white, with no grey tones. But illustrator Andres Guinaldo still makes it gross and memorable without color.

The comic adaptation was four issues, black and white, with no grey tones. But illustrator Andres Guinaldo still makes it gross and memorable without color.

 The rare find: a good movie tie-in cover.

The rare find: a good movie tie-in cover.